90 Replies Latest reply: Nov 20, 2013 10:18 AM by BrooklynRose Branched to a new discussion. RSS

Proctored exams...

I hope a faculty member can answer my question. Are there going to be any new changes to the proctored exams? What I would really think people would like, and would help us students out would be a sort of study guide. I am assuming that there are multiple tests that go out for students to take, but even if there are 100 possible things to study, I would rather know what I need to brush up on. Since the proctors only ask 10 questions for most of the subjects and and they are judged on how well they know the subject  matter from just that is pretty crazy and is very hit or miss with studying. I could be wrong, but I would think a decent amount of people have complained about failing proctored exams. This is because everyone goes into the tests blind, in a sense, since they weren't even sure where to start.This is just my opinion and I think it's something that needs improved to better serve the students and their education. After all, even the national exam has study guides out there for it.

Thanks for your consideration and replies

Amanda

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    heathermarie

    That sounds like a good idea! I will be taking my proctor exams soon (I'm in A&P1) and I'm beginning to stress out what will be on the test and what won't. I would like to know what exactly will be in the exam so that I can study and pass it

    I'm this type of person that doesn't like to fail at all so your suggestion just sounds awesome

    • Re: Proctored exams...

      um im still very confused on the proctors if u are a first year student do u have to do them if so can someone please explain what i need to do im so confused.

      • Re: Proctored exams...

        All four semesters have proctored exams. They are taken after you have finished all your classes for that semester. At the end of semester 2 and 4, the practicum is done.

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        Rachel Tuggle

        The proctors are essay only.  Some are open book, but most are not.  They are timed, so manage your time wisely.  When you near the end of a semester, you will have to submit a proctor request form, and the school must approve your proctor.  Study your coarse objectives, webinar notes, and your book notes.  Answer the questions at the end of the chapters, and study constantly.  There are study groups that may also be of help to you.  If you have questions, this is the place to ask....someone will have the answer you need.  Good luck.

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        raevettech2014

        Well what you will do is take the proctor exams after you completed your first vet tech intro class, Biology and Mathematics. It is a 4 hour test. I believe it is open book for the Biology and Mathematics portion, but closed book for you vet intro class. Hope this helps. You will also need to get someone to be your Proctor. You can go to your local library and the librarian should give you a list of people who can monitor the testing time.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    robynawalker

    I hope this comment is not taken the wrong way because I am not trying to sound mean or judgemental.  I only want to say what I have experienced.  I have been to several colleges and universities and have a bachelors degree and management certificate.  I cannot remember any class I took that gave an exam study guide.  It was up to you to read the syllabus and know all of the information that was presented in class and in the text books.  I took my proctors several weeks ago and they were hard.  I did not expect any less.  I used the course objectives in the front of our textbooks as my study guide.  In theory, a study guide for the exams might be a good idea, but you really should be studying it all anyway.  You're going to have to know it by the end of the program if you want to pass the national and state exams.

    • Re: Proctored exams...

      Which have study guides. Also I'm sure all of these tests had more than 10 questions to test whether you knew the material or not.

       

      Message was edited by: Amanda Nichols

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    • Re: Proctored exams...
      james.hurrell

      I LOVED your quote, Robyn - "I took my proctors several weeks ago and they were hard.  I did not expect any less.  I used the course objectives in the front of our textbooks as my study guide.  In theory, a study guide for the exams might be a good idea, but you really should be studying it all anyway.  You're going to have to know it by the end of the program if you want to pass the national and state exams."

       

      Soooooooooooooo true. Just studying the study guides to get a passing grade is mediocre. If this is someone's future career that has a passion for animals, they should want to be their BEST! The animals and owners we will impact in our future careers deserve the BEST we have to offer! If I ever have to see a doctor or a nurse for a serious disease later in my life, I want the BEST, not the mediocre ones who "just got by".

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        chatnoir

        Don't like the easy way? You'll love this: several decades ago, a veterinary college in England had gotten hold of a thyladon skull and asked students to identify it in an oral exam. Acceptable answers were thyladon, Tasmanian tiger, or "I have no idea."

        Seriously, though, while I don't want a guide to the exams, I would like an exam format that tests a wider range of knowledge. Ten representative questions from hundreds of pages of text are not really an accurate measure of what the student has learned.

        It would also be helpful to see the exams after they have been graded, so I know what I got right and what I need to review.

        My impression is that in the past, proctored exams were deliberately made difficult and daunting in order to show accrediting authorities that Penn Foster's vet tech program was "real." Hopefully, the desire to impress or intimidate others is part of the "old" program, and the new will concentrate on what is best for the students' future careers.

        Thanks for reading this whole spiel.

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        autumnbreeze

        Dr. Hurrell I feel like I need to pipe in on this one. I see alot of people stating how other colleges don't give out study guides for their tests, that you are just expected to study and know it. As much as I do agree that you need to study and know your material- tests are hard...and not in the way you think I mean. It is very stressful trying to prepare yourself for a test that you have no idea how it will be given, since there are so many formats. You can know everything but some people sit in front of that test and go blank because of the anxiety of it all. That being said I would like to mention that asking for this kind of study guide is not a new thing. You, yourself offered Review Questions and Answers for Veterinary Technicians, 4e: Thomas P. Colville DVM MSc: 9780323068017: Amazon.com: Book…  for students to study for the VTNE. And this is not something I've seen for just Vet Techs, I've seen study guides for nurses, paralegals, GED, SATs and so on.

        So as much as everyone is kind of hounding on the fact that we all need to know our stuff, not everyone does well in the testing environment and having study guides such as these would make it alot easier to face the exam with the actual reason we are taking the exam- to pass it to the best of our ability- instead of agonizing over the actual test itself.

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        Paramedic2448

        I Definitely see your point and I agree to an extent, but even in a regular class room they do study guides, the one near my home, gaston colleges program has a 99% pass rate. With this being said, we have to learn on our own and yea it's part of the program but some of us did not have A choice bc work, family etc. I love this school but its so difficult bc we don't get much help, hence why motivation is hard for me, bc I'm like am I even learning Anything bc of all the information I believe something would be nice! Can anyone tag any teacher or Doc Jim to this bc I can't thanks in advance!

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      mandytai

      I agree. I went to UW-River Falls and we never got study guides. We had to study the material we had learned throughout the year. None of us want to sound harsh. My friend went to Globe for vet tech and they didn't recieve study guides either. I have taken the proctor exams and they are tough but study your material and you'll do good. I think the nerves get the best of ya and it startles people when they see the packet!!!

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        natash

        STUDY TIP:  I take notes from every book (especially on things that i'm weak in) and then i put pg numbers every so often.  That way if you have any open book exams you can go back into the book for more info quickly.  I also write down or highlight any questions i get wrong on tests. (again to focus on your weak points)  I think of the study guides as basically  more notes.  And since PF so nicely wrote them i think they have very good info to focus on.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      DDHeart14

      I agree Robyn,  It could be very easy to get through these courses, but then you'll never pass the boards.  It is very important that you take it seriously and know the materials and understand it.  That is why this is not a good forum for some people.  It is very much a program for people who can and will do the work without a teacher pushing them two times a week in a classroom!

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    daniel.marotta

    Dr. Jim Hurrell any idea?

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    james.hurrell

    Hi, Amanda! Good question! 

     

    We are looking at some Proctored Exam ideas. We have not looked at the Study guide idea yet. Please read my response to Robyn's post. Haaaahahahaa............ as you can see, I have some pretty strong feelings about "the easy way". Not that Study Guides are the "easy way". But if someone invests the time into learning the objectives, takes good notes in Webinars, studies those notes before online Exams and the Proctored Exams, they should do very well on the Proctored Exam. Thank you for your idea. My Faculty TEAM will definitely look at this idea.

     

    I think ALL students will LOVE when we roll over to recorded lectures in all courses. That way, you all will be able to take notes, replay the recorded lectures if you need to, review those notes before exams, and really grasp the material even better. When this starts to occur in the next few weeks, Webinars will then be used by Faculty to enhance the learning of the material, with Q&A sessions, or overviews of key points, or perhaps Case Studies during the Webinars. Stay tuned! 

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      Minka

      The current and archived webinars are an excellent idea. Hence, listening the lectures, taking notes, paying attention to the pronunciation of the medical terminology, and reading the academic books, all that solidify our knowledge. Thus in my case I am learning for life, not to pass or barely scrape through the tests, exams, proctors, but to know/remember the essentials which I will certainly need when working in the clinic or the academic environment.

       

      I am not a great supporter of the Study Guide learning, as it is in many instances a narrow interpretation of what was already written in the textbook, and if I wanted to know more information to widen my knowledge, I had to pursue my research elsewhere, which satisfied my curiosity/interest well.

       

      I have noticed that Dr. Hurrell use the name Penn Foster Academy, and the Academy is a place of study in a special field. Thus for study is the devotion of time and attention to acquiring knowledge, especially from books (electronic, hard or paper backs it does not matter), as long as we are absorbing the information. Sorry, I am off my soap box, and let the other students share their opinions.

    • Re: Proctored exams...

      I am looking forward to the lectures, I think that they will help as well. I like the idea of webinars going over key points, that would help when studying as well. I think I just feel a little overwhelmed at the moment getting to the end of the semester going and back over all of the information that took almost a year to get through and learn. There was a good point made to use the study guides for each subject because there are key points in the front and that does make it more simple. Mostly I suppose my issue is with there only being 10 questions for each test on the proctored exams, it just seems like such a narrow judge of how well the material was learned, but that's just an opinion. I'm sure this is in consideration to the time it takes to do proctors in the first place, but it doesn't seem ideal to me is all.

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        Tamika Craft

        I agree! It's stressful enough to study for the final 3-4 classes worth of material and then take all the final exams in one sitting.  The study guide is a wealth of information for a whole course. It would be helpful to know exactly what to study for especially for several courses.  I have an issue with the 1 hour time allotted for each exam and I agree with having a short study guide to prepare for the final. That would help so much!

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      Linda Woerner

      I can't wait for the recorded lectures.  I just started diagnostic imaging, so far this class has been the hardest for me.  It would be nice to be able to start the lectures from the begining of the course, and watch them as you progress through the course. I can't wait to see them!

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        james.hurrell

        Think of taking x-rays as being the same is taking pictures with your digital camera, Linda. The only difference is the radiation source - light versus x-rays. Once you look at x-rays as "taking pictures", all of the physics of the x-ray machine (aka the "Ray Gun") starts to make more sense.

        • Re: Proctored exams...
          Linda Woerner

          THanks Dr. Jim.  I think once Ihet to the second part of positioning, I will grasp it better. It's just for some reason the exposure and parts and functions won't sink in.  I think I might have a learning disability when it comes to film exposure.  I have a super nice Nikon camera, my brother has acannon, and his girlfriend has a Sony.  We have afamily photo taking contest just about weekly.  Our local tv station has a segment on Fridays where they shopi chooses submitted photos at the end of the 5pm newscast.  We are always battling to get our wildlife photos on there.  They use their cameras fully, all the setting in manual.  I have books and magazines about digital photography, and still can't grasp it.  They try to teach me all the time.  I just gave up and photograph everything in auto setting. I am just finished the second lesson, and although I've been getting the self check answers right, without looking them up as well as the end of chapter questions right, I don't know why.  Which I know will be a big problem when it comes to proctors, because you don't only need to know the answer, you need to be able to explain why.  I will just keep going over the objectives. I think this is the course that is going to challenge me this semester, it's so weird how some people are great at certain subjects and lousy at others!

        • Re: Proctored exams...
          DKayJV

          I've been a Radiology Tech, (R)(ARRT) since May 2010 and never heard the X-ray tube referred to as a "Ray Gun". Interesting. In the Associate Degree Radiology program (Dona Ana, NM), the physics portion was the most difficult; however, don't loose hope because it will finally click.  It will all fall into place.

      • Re: Proctored exams...

        I too am looking forward to the new recorded lectures. One of the hardest things for me to get used to was coming into a webinar in the middle of a slide from the previous class. I always wanted to start a lecture series from the beginning but even the instructors did not know when they would be ready to start new. I think this was partly the question/answer time was so overwhelming. I bet it is hard as an instructor to ignore a student just because their question is off topic.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      Teri Scott

      I wish the books also came in audio books. I like to listen to the info while I am driving since my schedule is so busy. Hearing things also helps instead of just reading it. Offering both would be good.

    • Re: Proctored exams...

      I would love to see Case Study questions on the proctors! Those are my absolutely favorite questions because it really feels like we are in the clinic setting, helping the DVM and other techs to diagnose the patient. I might sound like a nerd, but that makes me excited! LOL

       

      I think the "study guides" we receive with the text books are great for preparing for the proctors! I feel strongly that if one needs an outline of what's going to be on the exam, then one is definitely NOT ready to take the exam, and should go back and brush up on things a bit. In the real world, we are not going to be given outlines of exactly what our days as Vet Techs will be; By learning and knowing everything, we are better equipped to help the patients and clients in any situation.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      DDHeart14

      I think a practice test would be great, maybe even an online practice test where you could keep retaking to see where your weaknesses are!  just a thought

  • Re: Proctored exams...

    I have study guides for all my classes. When I was sent my books for Intro to Vet Tech I was sent four green and white paperback books that say "study guide" on them. The study guide books I received for Biology and A&P1 are a condensed version of the actual textbook and proved helpful when I needed my textbook translated into wordage I could fully understand. Each of these books has section questions and some even have practice exams. When I read about the practicums in the Proctored Exam Instruction Booklet, it even suggested that I use them for review before my tests.

    I hope that you have been mailed all of your course material but just in case these study guides do not sound familiar, I suggest that you contact the education department for copies of them.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    Shaunna Dircks

    Everyone also needs to remember that the proctor is only worth 1/3 of the semester grade. That is part of the reason the exams are only 10 questions. Plus, someone has to read all of those exams. Imagine sitting for hours at a time reading 50 question exams, and each student takes 5-6 exams. Plus you would never be able to finish each exam in an hour if they had more than 10 questions. I am finishing my 3rd semester and every time I have taken a proctored exam, I have taken every single second I am allotted. Don't get too stressed out, study the guides and objectives, and try to find a study buddy if possible.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    sinman

    Hi Amanda! As someone who has taken the proctored exams before (I believe this is kind of public knowledge as well) they are all WRITTEN/ESSAY type questions.....of course you don't have to write a 5 page paper for every question, but there are no multiple choices....I think I may have had some true/false or matching, but don't take that as definitive because it was last December.

     

    We are given a study guide for the exams.....the PF books they send out all say 'study guide' on them! Its really just your job to find a way to internalize the important information in there. I have my own method, and it got me a 96 on Biology and an 89 on A&P1 if I remember right.....the two classes everyone considers the hardest. If you want me to give you the details on what I do, I'd be more than happy to message you. But like Dr. Jim said, if you take notes on EVERYTHING, pay attention in the webinars (I think having recorded lectures will help people follow along with the book more), and memorize, memorize, memorize....you should be fine.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      Lpomaville

      Hello,

       

      I studied for my first proctored exam every minute I had time and tried to memorize what I thought would be the important information.  Most of everything I studied was not on the test and I had to really strain to remember some of the material that was.  I felt very frustrated after I was done since I had spent hours studying material that was not on the test and very little time studying the materials that was.

       

      How do you go about outlining the information?  The test book was huge and the information was very detailed.  I tried to take notes and felt like I was re-writing the book.  I often times felt overwhelmed with so much information and had a hard time choosing what I thought would be the most important.

       

      I am waiting for my grade with great concern.  If you could share study tips I would really appreciate it.  I would try to study at least two hours a day if possible.

       

      Thanks

      • Re: Proctored exams...

        That sums up my point pretty much my whole point, thanks. That's exactly how I felt about the whole situation! Someone earlier mentioned there are learning objectives for the textbook in the front of each of the corresponding study guides that give you a good place to start, I am going to try that this time and see how prepared I feel when I take the proctor. Hopefully it helps!

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        sinman

        Well, I pretty much DID rewrite the study guide, haha. I'm someone who learns by doing (so in this case, writing it and reading it), so that worked for me. I pretty much went through the study guide, copied everything, and then went through the actual text books where available and added in anything I thought the study guide left out (for example, italicized/bold words, or an explanation for something that was mentioned in the study guide) with sticky notes. At the end of my Biology course, my 3 subject notebook was probably about 4 inches thick. In the weeks before I got my proctors, I just skimmed and re read all of the information. I think it helped that Biology was an open book test since it is not a VET course. As for A&P, I think the fact that I took it in high school helped a lot and so I can't say for sure if it was my method or just prior knowledge being stirred up. What I do won't work for everyone, and people sometimes don't even have time for it....I happen to be single with no kids, so outside of work (where I'm a vet tech) I don't have a lot vying for my attention.

         

        This semester, I have also started recording the webinars (I picked up a digital recorder for about $20 at Walmart) so we'll see if that helps.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    sdcross1

    I agree with you. I have not registered yet because I am about too. But I am nervous too because I want to make sure I am prepared for the proctor exams. If you fail a proctor exam there is a fee to retake it.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    amleonard

    My biggest issue with the proctored exams is that we are required to take final exams on an entire semester worth of material in a 5-6 hour time period.  I have a bachelors degree from a 4 year college and we were not even allowed to take more than 2 final exams in a day. We at Penn Foster are tested on the same amount of material at the end of each semester as I was tested on at a 4 year college; but we are expected to be prepared for an entire semester of courses and take finals on those courses in less than one day.  I feel at the very least we should be able to split our exams into two different test days (take half of our finals one day and the other half on another day). Or if they decide to offer the online proctored exams, we should be able to log in and only take 1 course final at a time.  I feel this might help people to not feel so overwhelmed with the question of "what to study for" and to be better prepared for each final.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      tomysgirl

      That's kind of my issue, too.  It seems to me that if we have 3 weeks to take the finals with our proctor, what difference does it make if we take all of them in one day, or one at a time within the 3-week time frame?  The proctor has a deadline to mail them back.  We still have closed book tests for the VET classes anyway.  That would make it more like a "regular" college where you have your finals spread out over usually a week or so.

       

      I don't know how online proctors would work?  How can someone be sure you aren't using your book for the closed-book exam?  I don't mind the proctor part, but it is kind of overwhelming to sit for several hours for final exams for ALL your courses at once.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      sdcross1

      Proctored Exams

       

       

       

       

       

      What is it?

       

       

       

      The proctored exams are simply “supervised” final exams that take place at the end of each semester. Your proctor will be someone you choose who will agree to meet with you to oversee your exam. You are not required to travel to Penn Foster to take the exams.

       

       

       

       

       

      Who is a proctor?

       

       

       

      A proctor must have an Associate’s degree or higher to qualify. Your proctor cannot be related to you or live at the same address. You can use a friend, coworker, manager, librarian etc. (Vet Tech has different requirements: no coworkers, or managers.)

       

       

       

       

       

      When and how is the exam given?

       

       

       

      After you have completed all courses in your semester, the school will notify you and your proctor about scheduling the exam. You are given at time period to prepare for the test and your proctor exams are mailed directly to your proctor. Instructions, for both you and the proctor, are included in the exam package.

       

       

       

       

       

      How long is the test?

       

       

       

      The exam is timed and takes approximately 2-4 hours to complete. The test is a combination of short essay questions and some multiple choice questions. You may bring your notes and text books. All exams are open-book except for some Vet Tech courses.

       

       

       

       

       

      What happens after the exam?

       

       

       

      Your proctor will collect the completed materials/exams and mail them to the school for grading. You will see your exam results posted on your student page in 7-10 days. Your proctor will not receive any information, such as grades, since your scores are confidential.

       

       

       

       

       

      Can I change my proctor?

       

       

       

      The school assumes you will keep the same proctor for semesters 1-4. However, you can change your proctor if necessary.

       

       

       

       

       

      How do I notify the school of my proctor choice?

       

       

       

      There is a proctor application that can be downloaded from your homepage in the Penn Foster student area. Have the proctor fill out the form and mail it to the school. You will be notified of the acceptance of the proctor.

       

       

       

       

       

      When will I receive a proctor package with a Proctor Acceptance Form?

       

       

       

      A proctor package will go up on the students My Courses page on the internet when the student is 50% through a semester. There are two parts to this package, consisting of a Proctor Exam Instruction Booklet and a Proctor Acceptance Form. The form will need to be printed out and submitted back to Penn Foster. Students cannot give proctor information over the phone. The information packet must be mailed back to us for review. If the student either does not have access to the internet, or is unable to print the form, they MUST contact us and we will mail out the Proctor Package.  If they do not contact us, nothing will get mailed.

       

       

       

      What are the requirements for choosing a proctor?

       

       

       

      All of Penn Foster's Associate Degree and Bachelor Degree programs require a proctor to be on file. (Within each semester of a degree program, there will be different requirements for students to complete before moving on to a new semester. These requirements can vary between proctored exams, applications projects, research projects, and practicums.)  The Travel Agent Program requires a proctor as well.  A proctor is defined as, "a person appointed to keep watch over students at examinations."  This applies to the final exam on certain subjects within a student's semester.

       

      There are three requirements for someone to qualify as a student’s proctor:

       

          Prospective candidate must have at least an Associate Degree

          The prospect cannot be related to the student or have the same address as the student

          The prospect cannot directly supervise the student in an employment situation (applies to Vet Tech only)

       

      The most acceptable and most commonly used proctors are librarians and human resource representatives, with 85% of our accepted proctors coming from these two areas.

       

      We cannot take proctor acceptance information over the telephone or through e-mail. The student needs to fill out, sign, and return the Proctor Acceptance Form.

       

      If the prospective proctor has been rejected, the student will be notified by mail that they must select another prospect. If the prospect has been approved

       

       

       

      When will I receive my proctor exam?

       

       

       

      Once a student has successfully completed all regular exams, grades have been posted and an accepted proctor is on file, the proctor exam will automatically be mailed out.  The student will get a notification of this.

       

       

       

      How much time do I have to complete my proctor exams?

       

       

       

      Students will be allowed approximately 5 to 6 hours to complete the proctor examination (time limits may vary depending on program and semester). The allotted time will be stated on the inside cover of the proctor exam folder.  Students are also entitled to 15 minute breaks, depending on the number of exams they have to take.  This information is disclosed to the proctor on the folder cover as well.

       

       

       

      I failed my proctor exam. Am I required to retake the exam?

       

       

       

      If a student fails a proctor exam they will be informed if they must take a retake. Not all students who fail a proctor exam should retake the exam.

       

       

       

       

       

      When will I receive my proctor grade?

       

       

       

      When the Education Department receives a proctor exam back, it is graded and posted as separate exams. Once all the exams within the proctor exam have been graded, the student will receive their overall grades for that semester. If you feel you have been waiting an unusually long time to receive your grades please call Student Services immediately at 1-888-427-1000 and verify they have received your exam.

       

       

       

      Will I be able to review my exam and answers after I take my proctor?

       

       

       

      No, you may call your instructor at 1.888.427.1000 and they can review your exam with you over the phone. You will not be provided with a copy nor will the exam be returned to you.

       

       

       

      Other Info

       

       

       

      Proctor exams consist of ONE exam for each subject within a semester unless the subject has a paper or project as the final exam. This means that a proctor may receive an exam to administer that consists of anywhere from 1 to 8 exams within a proctor exam folder.

       

       

       

      Students that have accepted credits transfer in will receive full credit for a course so they will not have to take a proctor exam for those courses.

       

       

       

       

      But I do agree with you! 5 to 7 exams in one day is too many exams in one day!

      • Re: Proctored exams...
        jonistew

        My biggest issue with the proctored exams is all the writing!  I do not as a rule spend a lot of time writing - everything I do is on a keyboard. ( I think this is true for most people now).  With transfer credits, I only had to complete 3 exams at the end of semester 1 and my hand and entire arm was so sore I don't think that I could have written any more if I had too. I was barely able to finish. In addition, my hand was becoming so sore that my writing became more and more difficult to read. I am very concerned about taking the exams in other semesters where I might have to complete 5 or 6 all at one time.  Who writes that much??? It would be nice if there was a way to take the exams in such a way that we could type our answers.  This would also make it much easier on the instructors that have to grade the exams as they would not have to deal with reading poor handwriting.  I also have a degree from a 4 year college and we were never required to take all exams on the same day.

        • Re: Proctored exams...
          Tamika Craft

          I agree with you 100%!!! I've just completed my 4th semester, working on my Bachelor's degree and it's been the same each time.  I never finish my exams! It's so frustrating. For a few of my classes, I was able to take my final exam at home on my student page and it was timed.  But it was 1 hour per question, multiple choice.  I wish they all were timed like that.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      Shaunna Dircks

      Keep in mind you have to take the entire VTNE in one setting... that is basically a final exam that covers 2-4 years worth of education. And yes you get a study guide, but in case you haven't seen it, let me tell you. Its about the size of the Biology book full of multiple choice questions to try to memorize for the 225 question test. There are probably more than 1,000 questions in the 'study guide'

    • Re: Proctored exams...

      I agree with you on the time constraint. I also think it would helpful if both sides of each answer sheet were lined.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    swhee007

    I just recently took my proctor exams and they were ten times harder than what I expected. My biggest issue is the time restraint. It was difficult for me to answer the essay questions in an hour time limit. I didnt feel that I had enough time to fully explain my answer and ended up short changing a few answers. I also agree it would be helpful to have some sort of guideline to follow. I attended a university for a year and no my professors didnt give you study guides however they did hint to what might be a good thing to really pay attention to. I studied everything from webinar powerpoints to the book to the "Study guide books" and I still didn't feel prepared because there was just so much information to be covered and remembered.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      dianemk

      I agree with you on the time constraint!  I didn't expect the finals to be easy but I just wish I had a little more time to fully answer my questions.  The directions for most questions say to answer in essay form and full sentences and I was doing that but found myself running out of time on all the exams.  I felt I was skimping on questions I knew the answers to just to try to fit it all in!

      I don't really mind the format, and spent a lot of time studying the objectives in the front of my study guide, but maybe change it to 90 minutes or 2 hours per exam?  I would definately have felt less rushed.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      danahannan

      I always go in and write like crazy until I get through the exams.  I've never finished an exam with more than a couple of minutes to spare.  That's probably a good sign though- it means we know the topics well enough to write a good bit about them!

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    Jami Byrd

    I'm scared!!!!!! I am studying for my 1st semester proctors as we speak. This is a lot for this 54 year old brain of mine! I have even been researching "Brain Foods" to help with my memory..........But I forget to eat them! Well, back to the grind.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    Jami Byrd

    Well I took my 1st semester proctors last Friday. I am so glad I kept my grade up throughout the semester, and I hope it is enough to carry me through. I finish every test just in the nick of time, but there wasn't anytime to check my answers. Now I wait, chomping at the bit. I have worked so hard for 9 months, but now, at this point, it isn't an matter of getting an A or even a B, it is a matter of passing. I understand each semester gets harder.......YIKES!! I'll blame it on being 54 and working full time. Yeah, that works     

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      BrooklynRose

      Jami, I agree with your comment about working so hard for the top grade, and then it seems like that goal goes out the window and you just want the passing grade!  I've been thinking about that ever since I submitted my first proctor last week...waiting for the grade!

       

      Thanks for sharing

       

      Lori

  • Re: Proctored exams...

    I still have a way to go before facing proctors (I'm in the midst of Intro. to Vet Tech), but I'm a little confused about the exam.  Will it include material from every course (Intro. though Computer Applications), or it it the core vet courses; Intro., Biology & A&P 1?

     

    Any Information would be appreciated.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      Diane Placidi

      Tracy,

       

      At this time the information is not yet on your My Courses page. Once you have completed several more lessons, you will see the Proctor Exam section pop up. We advise you to read the Instruction Booklet. In there are Q&A along with suggestions on how to write your essay answers and sample questions.

      You will find that in every semester there will be subjects that include proctored exams and some that do not. Here is a simple way for you to know. When you have completed all lessons and/or class participations in a particular subject, look just below the subject name. Example: Orientation to Vet Technology. You will see that it says "Course Average 95". That means you have completed that subject, while as with Introduction to Vet Techology, once you have completed all lesson it will not have "Course Average" at all. That means there is a proctored exam for that subject.

      This will hold true for all semesters.

      Hope this helps.

  • Re: Proctored exams...

    I just finished my exams forsemester 1. They were difficult for sure, but nothing we can't handle. We study for the exams and are prepared for what ever questions they ask. We as students should welcome the challenges the school gives. It's only going to make us stronger and better at what we do.

  • Re: Proctored exams...

    Great point to bring up!

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    sregars

    I just finished semester 1 exams. The time restraint is a minor issue to me... My biggest issue was that on the A & P exam there were 2 questions (heavily weighted) that addressed very obscure things. One was not mentioned in the Study Guide or in any webinar I attended. It only had 1 paragraph in the back of the book. Also, on the Intro to Vet Tech exam they included 2 items from the Orientation to Vet Tech course. The exam should have been entitled Orientation/Intro to Vet Tech. Makes me nervous to study for the next exams...The A&P courses have a ton that IS mentioned much less the obscure things we need to guess will be on the test. Frustrated because I studied a ton. I am a good student also. I have a double major BA and graduated with a 3.6-3.8 gpa.

    • Re: Proctored exams...
      jonistew

      I agree with you, Shelly. I just finished my semester 2 exams. There is so much material to cover and you have just a few questions to answer - some of which are about very minor things that you will never have to deal with in clinical practice. I don't believe these exams are a good reflection of the basic knowledge that you have when you complete the courses. I would rather see a 100 question multiple choice exam in each course as it would give a better assessment of your overall  knowledge of the subject material. Furthermore, that is how the VTNE and state board exams are set up so it would give us more practice in taking those types of exams.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    danahannan

    I actually enjoy the essay format. I've had an occasional question that stumped me, but usually I know something (maybe/for sure not everything haha) about a topic so I can get something going with my answer.  Sometimes I leave space and go back to add to after I finish if I have time.  A lot of times after I've answered a few other questions the brain cells kick in and I remember more...

     

    I guess I'v been lucky, but most of the proctors I've had seem to have focused on pretty significant topics.

     

    I am anxious about the VTNE though.  It is a new format and I'm hoping to use some of the sites that Dr Jim has put on the community to prepare...

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    Lpomaville

    I Agree.  I study constantly and yet the questions on the final seldom are the material I studied.  If we could be given an idea as to what areas they will cover it would be less frustrating.

  • Re: Proctored exams...
    karissastraw

    I just took my proctor exam today, and it was so hard. I tried my best to study, but some of the questions were not familiar to me. I've always found it hard to study for things because I tend to get overwhelmed. It was extremely hard and I hope I pass. What do you have to have to pass? I feel like I did a horrible job. If I do fail, Do I just take it again? Also I have another question, I got a letter from Penn Foster saying in order for them to send me my re-enrollment form they need proof that I finished HS, but wouldn't I already done that before I started this program? Any advice or answers will help!

    Thank You

    Karissa